Home Read Now Hear This: Savoy Brown | Ain’t Done Yet

Now Hear This: Savoy Brown | Ain’t Done Yet

I'm getting caught up on the good albums that have come out lately. Like this one.

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THE PRESS RELEASE: “Legendary British blues-rock band Savoy Brown — led by founding member Kim Simmonds — have released their new album Ain’t Done Yet. The new album follows their critically acclaimed 2019 album City Night.

“The new album continues the approach I’ve been taking with the band this past decade,” says guitarist/singer/songwriter Simmonds, who formed the band in 1965 in London, England, making them one of the longest-running blues-rock bands in existence. “The big difference with the new album is the multi-layer approach I took to recording the guitar parts. It’s all blues-based rock music. I try to find new and progressive ways to write and play the music I’ve loved since I was a young teenager.”

Simmonds has been the group’s guiding hand from the first singles released in 1966 through this newest effort, Savoy Brown’s 41st album. On the new record, Simmonds (guitar harmonica, vocals) is joined by his long-running bandmates Pat DeSalvo (bass) and Garnet Grimm (drums).

Ain’t Done Yet was recorded at Showplace Studios, Dover, New Jersey. I produced the album and worked closely with studio owner and engineer Ben Elliott. It’s a studio I’ve used many times before and it has a rich history of blues rock musicians recording there including Keith Richards, Eric Clapton and Leslie West.”

“This is the sixth album I’ve made with Ben Elliott since the 1990s, and on previous ones I’ve had various guests join me including Hubert Sumlin, Lonesome Dave Peverett and Duke Robillard,” continues Kim. “Shortly after making Ain’t Done Yet, Ben Elliot died. I have dedicated the new album to him. It will be the last album recorded at Showplace Studios.”

Energetic blues has been the calling card of the band from the beginning, but Simmonds infuses the 10 tracks on Ain’t Done Yet with a new spirit and vitality — plus some serious guitar chops — in a variety of styles and roots sounds that transcend the blues-rock idiom. “I emphasized song content on the new album, and left room for band improvisation,” he admits. “For instance, there are two acoustic-based songs and also two six-minute songs where I’m able to stretch out on guitar solos.”